Martha Brotherton

Martha Brotherton's story was published at least seven times.

American Bulletin on July 16, 1842
Warsaw Signal July 23, 1842
Louisville Journal July 25, 1842
New York Herald July 25, 1842
Alton Telegram July 30, 1842
Quincy Whig August 6, 1842
John C. Bennett's expose September 1842

American Bulletin

July 16, 1842

FOR  THE  BULLETIN.

Missrs. Editors: -- I am about to repair to the East for the purpose of publishing a "HISTORY OF THE SAINTS," or important disclosures in relation to Joe Smith and the Mormons; I shall, however, be in readiness to substantiate my statements relative to the participation of Joe Smith in the attempted assassination of Gov. Boggs, whenever he is demanded and secured by the Executive of Missouri.

I am blamed by some for not [making disclosures] at an earlier day, as I must have been apprised of Smith's enormities for a long time -- this I anticipated; but if gentlemen will hold on a short time, until I publish the aforesaid history, I will show to the entire satisfaction of of all candid men, that had an expose been attempted at an earlier period it would have proved abortive; but I am now enabled to show such a system of deliberate swindling, corruption, and base depravity, as the world has never seen. The following letter from Miss Brotherton, details a case of black-hearted villainy precisely similar to those of Mrs. Sarah Pratt, wife of Prof. Orson Pratt, and Miss Nancy Rigdon, daughter of Sidney Rigdon, Esq., as noticed in the "Sangamo Journal," and hundreds of others that might be named -- it speaks for itself.

Yours, respectfully,
                              JOHN C. BENNETT.

ST, LOUIS, July 15th 1842.

  ST. LOUIS, July 13th, A. D. 1842.


Gen. John C. Bennett.


    DEAR SIR: -- I left Warsaw a short time since for this city, and having been called upon by you, through the "Sangamo Journal," to come out and disclose to the world the facts of the case in relation to certain propositions made to me at Nauvoo, by some of the Mormon leaders, I now proceed to respond to the call, and discharge what I consider to be a duty devolving upon me as an innocent, but insulted and abused female. I had been at Nauvoo near three weeks, during which time my father's family received frequent visits from elders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, two of the Mormon apostles; when early one morning they both came to my brother-in-law's (John McIlwrick's) house, at which place I then was on a visit, and particularly requested me to go and spend a few days with them. I told them I could not at that time, as my brother-in-law was not at home; however, they urged me to go the next day, and spend one day with them -- the day being fine I accordingly went. When I arrived at the foot of the hill Young and Kimball were standing conversing together. They both came to me, and, after several flattering compliments, Kimball wished me to go to his house first. I said it was immaterial to me, and accordingly went. We had not, however, gone many steps when Young suddenly stopped, and said he would go to that brother's, (pointing to a little log hut a few yards distant) and tell him that you (speaking to Kimball,) and brother Glover, or Grover, (I do not remember which,) will value his land. When he had gone, Kimball turned to me and said, "Martha, I want you to say to my wife, when you go to my house, that you want to buy some things at Joseph's store, (Joseph Smith's) and I will say, I am going with you to show you the way. You know you want to see the Prophet, and you will then have an opportunity." I made no reply. Young again made his appearance, and the subject was dropped. We soon reached Kimball's house, where Young took his leave, saying, "I shall see you again, Martha." I remained at Kimball's near an hour, when Kimball seeing that I would not tell the lies he wished me to, told them to his wife himself. He then went and whispered in her ear, and asked if that would please her. "Yes," said she, "or I can go along with you and Martha." "No,' said he, "I have some business to do, and I will call for you afterwards to go with me to the debate,"  meaning the debate between yourself and Joseph. To this she consented. So Kimball and I went to the store together. As we were going along, he said, "Sister Martha, are you willing to do all that the Prophet requires you to do?" I said I believed I was, thinking of course he would require nothing wrong. "Then," said he, "are you ready to take counsel?" I answered in the affirmative, thinking of the great and glorious blessings that had been pronounced upon my head, if I adhered to the counsel of those placed over me in the Lord. "Well," said he, "there are many things revealed in these last days that the world would laugh and scoff at; but unto us is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom." He further observed, "Martha, you must learn to hold your tongue, and it will be well with you. -- You will see Joseph, and very likely have some conversation with him, and he will tell you what you shall do." When we reached the building he led me up some stairs to a small room, the door of which was locked, and on it the following inscription: -- "Positively no admittance." He observed, "Ah! brother Joseph must be sick, for, strange to say, he is not here. Come down into the tithing-office, Martha." He then left me in the tithing-office and went out, I know not where. In this office were two men writing, one of whom, William Clayton, I had seen in England; the other I did not know. Young came in and seated himself before me, and asked where Kimball was. I said he had gone out. He said it was all right. Soon after Joseph came in and spoke to one of the clerks, and then went up stairs followed by Young. Immediately after Kimball came in. "Now, Martha," said he, "the Prophet has come; come up stairs." I went, and we found Young and the Prophet alone. I was introduced to the Prophet by Young. Joseph offered me his seat, and, to my astonishment, the moment I was seated Joseph and Kimball walked out of the room, and left me with Young, who arose, locked the door, closed the window, and drew the curtain. He then came and sat before me and said, "This is our private room, Martha." "Indeed, sir," said I, "I must be highly honored to be permitted to enter it." He smiled, and then proceeded -- "Sister Martha, I want to ask you a few questions; will you answer them?" "Yes, sir," said I. "And will you promise not to mention them to any one?" "If it is your desire, sir," said I, "I will not." "And you will not think any the worse of me for it, will you, Martha?" said he. "No sir," I replied. "Well," said he, "what are your feelings towards me?" -- I replied, "My feelings are just the same towards you that they ever were, sir.." "But, to come to the point more closely," said he, "have not you an affection for me, that, were it lawful and right, you could accept of me for your husband and companion?" My feelings at that moment were indescribable. God only knows them. What, thought I, are these men that I thought almost perfection itself, deceivers. and is all my fancied happiness but a dream? 'Twas even so; but my next thought was, which is the best way for me to act at this time? If I say no, they may do as they think proper; and to say yes, I never would. So I considered it best to ask for time to think and pray about it. I therefore said, "If it was lawful and right perhaps I might; but you know, sir, it is not." "Well, but," said he, "brother Joseph has had a revelation from God that it is lawful and right for a man to have two wives; for as it was in the days of Abraham, so it shall be in these last days and whoever is the first that is willing to take up the cross will receive the greatest blessings; and if you will accept of me I will take you straight to the celestial kingdom; and if you will have me in this world, I will have you in that which is to come, and brother Joseph will marry us here to-day, and you can go home this evening, and your parents will not know any thing about it." "Sir," said I, "I should not like to do any thing of the kind without the permission of my parents." "Well, but," said he, "you are of age, are you not?" "No, sir," said I, "I shall not be until the 24th of May." "Well," said he, "that does not make any difference. You will be of age before they know, and you need not fear. If you will take my counsel it will be well with you, for I know it to be right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it. But brother Joseph wishes to have some talk with you on the subject -- he will explain things -- will you hear him?" "I do not mind," said I. "Well, but I want you to say something," said he. "I want time to think about it," said I. "Well," said he, "I will have a kiss, any how," and then rose and said he would bring Joseph. -- He then unlocked the door, and took the key and locked me up alone. He was absent about ten minutes and then returned with Joseph. "Well," said Young, "sister Martha would be willing if she knew if was lawful and right before God." "Well, Martha," said Joseph, "it is lawful and right before God -- I know it is. Look here, sis; don't you believe in me?" I did not answer. -- "Well Martha," said Joseph, "just go ahead, and do as Brigham wants you to -- he is the best man in the world except me." "Oh!" said Brigham, "then you are as good." "Yes," said Joseph. "Well," said Young, "we believe Joseph to be a Prophet. -- I have known him near eight years, and always found him the same." "Yes," said Joseph, "and I know that this is lawful and right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it before God; and I have the keys of the kingdom, and whatever I bind on earth is bound in heaven, and whatever I loose on earth is loosed in heaven; and if you will accept of Brigham, you shall be blessed -- God shall bless you, and my blessing shall rest upon you, and if you will be led by him, you will do well; for I know Brigham will take care of you, and if he don't do his duty to you, come to me and I will make him; and if you do not like it in a month or two, come to me, and I will make you free again; and if he turns you off, I will take you on." -- "Sir," said I, rather warmly, "it will be too late to think in a month or two after. I want time to think first." "Well, but," said he, "the old proverb is, 'nothing ventured, nothing gained;' and it would be the greatest blessing that was ever bestowed upon you." -- "Yes," said Young, "and you will never have reason to repent it -- that is, if I do not turn from righteousness, and that I trust I never shall, for I believe God, who has kept me so long, will continue to keep me faithful. Did you ever see me act in any way wrong in England, Martha?" "No, sir," said I. "No," said he; "neither can any one else lay any thing to my charge." "Well, then," said Joseph, "what are you afraid of, sis? -- come, let me do the business for you." "Sir," said I, "do let me have a little time to think about it, and I will promise not to mention it to any one." "Well, but look here," said he, "you know a fellow will never be damned for doing the best he knows how." "Well, then," said I, "the best way I know of, is to go home and think and pray about it." -- "Well," said Young, "I shall leave it with brother Joseph, whether it would be best for you to have time or not." "Well," said Joseph, "I see no harm in her having time to think, if she will not fall into temptation." "O, sir," said I, "there is no fear of my falling into temptation." "Well, but," said Brigham, "you must promise me you will never mention it to any one." "I do promise it," said I. "Well," said Joseph, "you must promise me the same." I promised him the same. "Upon your honor," said he, "you will not tell." "No, sir, I will lose my life first," said I. "Well, that will do," said he; "that is the principle we go upon. I think I can trust you, Martha," said he. -- "Yes," said I, "I think you ought." Joseph said, "she looks as if she could keep a secret." I then rose to go, when Joseph commenced to beg of me again -- he said it was the best opportunity they might have for months, for the room was often engaged. I, however, had determined what to do. -- "Well," said Young, "I will see you to-morrow. I am going to preach at the school-house, opposite your house. I have never preached there yet; you will be there, I suppose." "Yes," said I. The next day being Sunday, I sat down, instead of going to meeting, and wrote the conversation, and gave it to my sister, who was not a little surprised, but she said it would be best to go to meeting in the afternoon. We went, and Young administered the sacrament. After it was over, I was passing out, and Young stopped me, saying, "Wait, Martha, I am coming." I said, "I cannot; my sister is waiting for me." He then threw his coat over his shoulders, and followed me out, and whispered, "have you made up your mind, Martha?" "Not exactly, sir," said I; and we parted. I shall proceed to a justice of the peace, and make oath to the truth of these statements, and you are at liberty to make what use of them you may think best.


              Yours, respectfully,
                   MARTHA H. BROTHERTON.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, this 13th day of July, A. D. 1842.

              Du. BOUFFAY FREMON,
    Justice of the Peace for St. Louis county.

Warsaw Signal

July 23, 1842

The Louisville Daily Journal

July 25, 1842

We copy below, from the Sangamo Journal, the second letter of Gen. Bennett, portraying the character and detailing the horrible and revolting conduct of Joe Smith, the prophet and leader of the Mormons. The exposition, as our readers will see, does not rest at all upon the personal veracity of Gen. Bennett himself, but is sustained by the affidavits of men and women who cannot be mistaken as to the facts stated, and who have no motive for misrepresenting them. Those facts are proved by testimony strong enough to send any man on earth, prophet or no prophet, to the penitentiary or the gallows.

The people in other States have in general no conception of the extent of Joe Smith's power in Illinois. There are several thousands of voters in his church, and he commands all their votes as fully as he commands his own. In consideration of the extraordinary and monstrous privileges conferred on him and his church by the late Locofoco Legislature of the State, he now requires his voters to go for all the Locofoco candidates for office; and he has issued his proclamation to that effect. The consequence is, that he is, for the present, secure from punishment for his atrocious crimes and transgressions. However overwhelming the proofs of his habitual perpetration of the blackest crimes known to the laws, the Locofoco authorities of Illinois dare not punish him, lest they lose the tremendous vote at his command in the approaching elections. So the Prophet and his followers can run riot in crime, unawed by God, and unrestrained by man.

Of the extraordinary and unparalleled privileges and powers conferred on the Mormons in their city charter passed by the late Locofoco Legislature, we have not time now to speak in detail. One section of that charter confers on the city council the power to confine men in prison for life for ant breach of their ordinances and, under the authority of that section, the council have already passed an ordinance, by which any man, who, in passing through Nauvoo, speaks disrespectfully of Joe Smith, may be arrested and imprisoned with or without process. Under another section, Joe Smith has been made Lieutenant General -- "an office," says the Sangamo Journal, "which was never before held by any individual in this country except Washington; and, in virtue of which, the Prophet claims that, in time of war, he is the head of the army of the United States." It is a remarkable fact, that, in the law authorizing the organization of the Mormon legion, neither the officers nor the troops composing it are required to make oath to support the Constitution of the country.

But we have not room to-day for further remarks. We proceed to the publication of Gen. Bennett's second letter. The editor of the Sangamon Journal, in publishing it, alludes to divers names not mentioned by Gen. B. It says: ""We implore Messrs. CHAUNCEY L. HIGBEE, HENRY MARKS, Mrs. SARAH M. PRATT, Miss. NANCY RIGDON, and Miss MITCHELL, all of Nauvoo; and Rev. SAMUEL JAMES, and Capt. JOHN F. OLNEY, of La Harpe, and Messrs. KILBOURNS, of Montrose, Iowa, to come out with published statements, as to their own knowledge of Smith's lascivious and hellish acts."

 

(From the Sangamon Journal.)

MORMON  DEVELOPMENTS.

To the Editor of the Sangamon Journal:

                            CARTHAGE, Hancock County, Ill.,
                                        July 2, A. D. 1842.


I am now in this place, in order to attend to some of my official duties, as master in chancery; and having some leisure time, I shall proceed with my history of Joe Smith and his saints. It is my determination to state facts, and such facts as will arouse the public indignation, if there is yet virtue and courage left in man -- for we are exhorted to be enterprising and courageous; but the beast and false prophet (Joe Smith) shall tremble in the days of his captivity like an aspen leaf in the wilderness. The "Lord's anointed," as Joe is called, must be washed in the laver of the law, until his polluted carcass, and corrupt soul, shall be purified by fire. And to begin:

1st. On the 17th day of May, A.D. 1842, Joe Smith requested to see me alone in the preparation-room of the Nauvoo Lodge, U. D., on some important business. We entered, and he locked the door, put the key in his pocket, and drew a pistol on me and said: "The peace of my family requires that you should sign an affidavit, and make a statement before the next city council, on the 19th, exonerating me from all participation whatever, either directly or indirectly, in word or deed, in the spiritual wife doctrine, or private intercourse with females in general; and if you do not do it with apparent cheerfulness, I will make cat-fish bait of you, or deliver you to the Danites for execution to-night." I was not aware until Sunday last, that any other person was apprized of the fact of the threat of murder, but on that day Col. Francis M. Higbee told me in the presence of George W. Robinson, that if it came to the worst, he was in possession of a secret that would open the eyes of the people, and that he would file his affidavit if necessary; but he would not tell me what the secret was. Gen. Robinson, however, informed me afterwards that it was a knowledge of Joe's threats of murder. On the 30th of June, 1842, I called upon Col. Higbee for his affidavit, which was taken before Gen. Hiram Kimball, an alderman of the city, and is in the following words, to wit:

"State of Illinois,   }
  "Hancock County,} ss.

"Personally appeared before me, Hiram Kimball, an alderman of the city of Nauvoo, Francis M. Higbee, who being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that Joseph Smith told him that John C. Bennett could be easily put aside or drowned, and no person would be the wiser for it, so, and that it ought to be attended to; and he further remarked that the sooner this was done the better for the church, fearing, as he said, that Bennett would make some disclosures prejudicial to said Smith. This was about the time of Bennett's withdrawal from the church, or a short time before; and further this deponent saith not.
                      "FRANCIS M. HIGBEE.

"Sworn to and subscribed this 30th day of June, A. D. 184[2].
                        "HIRAM KIMBALL, Alderman."

Now I call upon Col. Francis M. Higbee to come out and tell what he told Gen. Robinson and myself in relation to the murder of a certain prisoner in Missouri. Col. Higbee, do not fear to tell the dreadful story; tell exactly how Joe had the murder done up, and what part he ordered you to take in the affair, but which you did not take. Tell it as Robinson knows it, and as you told me, and do not fear. Governor Reynolds will make another demand, and Joe shall be delivered over. I will visit Missouri and tell the dreadful story. Let the call be made, and the laws shall be executed.

3d. MY LATE VISIT TO SPRINGFIELD. -- On my arrival in Carthage I found, as all the citizens well knew, that I was followed by Mr. O. P. Rockwell, a Danite, who on his arrival late in the night, made strict enquiries as to where I was. His ostensible business was to put a letter in the post office; but judge ye the real design. I was prepared for the gentleman, and he approached me not; but another swift rider, Captain John D. Parker, another Danite, followed me to Springfield, to carry a letter to Dr. Helm; but he had another object, and you may well suppose what it was. I told Capt. Parker that I was aware of his object, but I feared him not. At Virginia, in Cass county, on my return, Parker met me again, and I called the attention of the stage-driver to him, who thereupon put two additional balls into his pistol, and then informed me that he was ready for him or any other person having the same object in view. Many of the Danites have been around me in Nauvoo for the purpose of secret murder, in order to save the arch impostor, (Joe Smith) from public infamy.

4th. Mrs. Sarah M. Pratt, wife of Professor Orson Pratt, of the University of the city of Nauvoo. -- Joe Smith stated to me at an early day in the history of that city, that he intended to make that amiable and accomplished lady one of his spiritual wives, for the Lord had given her to him, and he requested me to assist him in consummating his hellish purposes, but I told him that I would not do it; that she had been much neglected and abused by the church during the absence of her husband in Europe, and that if the Lord had given her to him he must attend to it himself. "I will do it," said he, "for there is no harm in it, if her husband should never find it out." I called upon Mrs. Pratt and told that Joe contemplated an attack on her virtue, in the name of the Lord, and that she must prepare to repulse him in so infamous an assault. She replied, "Joseph cannot be such a man. I cannot believe it until I know it for myself or have it from his own lips; he cannot be so corrupt." "Well," I replied, "you will see unless he changes his mind." Accordingly in a few days Joe proposed to me to go to Ramus with him. I consented to go, and we started from his house about 4 o'clock P. M., rode into the prairie a few miles, and returned to the house of Captain John T. Barnett, in Nauvoo, about dusk, where we put up the horse with Barnett's permission. He (Joe) pretended we were looking for thieves. We then proceeded to the house where Mrs. Pratt resided, and Joe commenced discourse as follows: "Sister Pratt, the Lord has given you to me as one of my spiritual wives. I have the blessings of Jacob granted me, as he granted holy men of old, and I have long looked upon you with favor, and hope you will not deny me." She replied: "I care not for the blessings of Jacob, and I believe in no such revelations, neither will I consent under any circumstances. I have one good husband, and that is enough for me." Joe could not come it! He then went off to see Miss _____ at the house of Mrs. Sherman. He remained with her an hour or two and then returned to Barnett's, harnessed our horse, started for Ramus, and arrived at Carthage at early breakfast. We then went to Ramus, and returned to Carthage that night, and put up at the house of Esq. Comer. Next day we returned to Nauvoo. I called upon Mrs. Pratt and asked her what she thought of Joseph? She replied, "He is a bad man beyond a doubt." Mrs. Pratt in a conversation with Mrs. Goddard, wife of Stephen H. Goddard, said, "Sister Goddard, Joseph is a corrupt man; I know it, for he made an attempt upon me." Three times afterwards he tried to convince Mrs. Pratt of the propriety of his doctrine, and she at last told him: "Joseph, if you ever attempt any thing of the kind with me again, I will tell Mr. Pratt on his return home. I will certainly do it." Joe replied, "Sister Pratt, I hope you will not expose me; if I am to suffer, all suffer; so do not expose me. Will you agree not to do so?" "If," said she, "you will never insult me again, I will not expose you unless strong circumstances require it." "Well, sister Pratt," says Joe, "as you have refused me; it becomes sin, unless sacrifice is offered;" and turning to me he said, "General, if you are my friend I wish you to procure a lamb, and have it slain, and sprinkle the door posts and the gate with its blood, and take the kidneys and entrails and offer them upon an altar of twelve stones that have not been touched with a hammer, as a burnt offering, and it will save me and my priesthood. Will you do it?" I will, I replied. So I procured the lamb from Captain John T. Barnett, and it was slain by Lieutenant Stephen H. Goddard, and I offered the kidneys and entrails in sacrifice for Joe as he desired; and Joe said, "all is now safe. The destroying angel will pass over, without harming any of us."

Time passed on in apparent friendship until Joe grossly insulted Mrs. Pratt again, after her husband had returned home, by approaching and kissing her. This highly offended her, and she told Mr. Pratt, who was much enraged and went and told Joe never to offer an insult of the like again. Joe replied, "I did not desire to kiss her." I now appeal to Mrs. Pratt if this is not true to the very letter. Just speak out boldly.

5th. Miss Nancy Rigdon, daughter of Sidney Rigdon, Esq. -- Joe Smith said to me last summer: "If you will assist me in procuring Nancy as one of my spiritual wives, I will give you five hundred dollars, or the best lot on Main street." I replied, "I cannot agree to it. Elder Rigdon is one of my best friends, and his family are now pure and spotless, and it would be a great pity to approach the truly virtuous." "But," says Joe, "the Lord has given her to me to wife. I have the blessings of Jacob, and there is no wickedness in it. It would be wicked to approach her unless I had permission of the Lord, but as it is, it is as correct as to have a legal wife in a moral point of view." "It may be so," said I, "but you must see her yourself. I cannot approach her on a subject of the kind. Then I supposed the matter had ended; but at the funeral of Mr. Ephraim R. Marks, Mrs. Hyde told Miss Rigdon, that Joseph desired to see her at the printing office, where Mrs. Hyde resides, on special business. She said she would go, and accordingly did, but Joe was busily engaged at his store; Dr. Willard Richards, however, one of the holy twelve Mormon apostles, whom I had long suspected as being up to his eyes in the business with Joe, came in and said, "Miss Nancy, Joseph cannot be in to-day. Please call again on Thursday." This she agreed to do; but she communicated the matter to Colonel Francis M. Higbee, who was addressing her, and asked his advice as to the second visit. I then came to a knowledge of the facts, and went immediately to Joe, and said to him, "Joseph, you are a master-mason, and Nancy is a master-mason's daughter, so stay your hand, or you will get into trouble." Joe replied: "You are my enemy, and wish to oppose me." "No," said I, "I am not your enemy, but you had better stop where you are."

I then went to Col. Higbee and told him Joe's designs, and requested him to go immediately and see Miss Rigdon and tell her the infernal plot -- that Joe would approach her in the name of the Lord, by revelation, &c. -- and to put her on her guard, but advise her to go and see for herself what Joe would do. He did so, and she went down. Joe was there, and took her into a private room, ;ocked the door, and commenced by telling her that he had long loved her, and had asked the Lord for her, and that it was his holy will that he should have her. He told her that it would not prevent her from marrying any other person; that he had the blessings of Jacob granted to him, and all that was right; he desired to kiss her, and wished her to kiss him. She said she would alarm the neighbors if he did not open the door, and let her out; he did so, and requested Mrs. Hyde to explain matters to her. Joe swore her to eternal secrecy. Mrs. Hyde told her that these things looked strange to her at first, but she would become more reconciled on mature reflection. Miss Rigdon replied: "I never shall." Joe agreed to write her, and did so in a few days through Dr. Richards. That letter is now safe in the hands of her friends. I have seen it, so has her father, and various other persons. On Tuesday last, Joe came up to Mr. Rigdon's, accompanied by his High Priest, George Miller, of sable sister notoriety, for a witness, and by boisterous words and violent gestures tried to deny the attempted seduction and alarm the girl; but she told him he was a liar, and that he could not face her to it. Joe then made a full acknowledgment of the whole affair. All the family, and many other persons were present. The holy George observed: "You must not harm the Lord's anointed; the Lord will not suffer his anointed to fall!!" Now call upon Miss Rigdon for the truth of the foregoing. Joe, did you offer another lamb in sacrifice as a burnt-sin offering on an altar of twelve stones? If not, look out for the destroying angel, for he will surely get you.

6th. Now I call upon Miss Martha Brotherton, of Warsaw, to come out and tell boldly the base attempt on her virtue, when in Nauvoo -- how she was locked up, and the proposals that were made to her. I saw her taken to the accursed room, and now let her come out boldly and tell the corruptions of these holy men. The public requires it -- justice and honor require it.

8th. Mrs. Melissa Schindle, wife of Col. George Schindle. I now proceed to give the affidavit of Mrs. Schindle, which is in the following words, to wit:

"State of Illinois,         ) ss.
"McDonough County.)

"Personally appeared before me, Abram Fulkerson, one of the justices of the peace in and for said county, Melissa Schindle, who, being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith, that in the fall of 1841, she was staying one night with the widow Fuller, who has recently been married to a Mr. Warren, in the city of Nauvoo, and that Joseph Smith came into the room where she was sleeping about 10 o'clock at night, and after making a few remarks came to her bed-side, and asked her if he could have the privilege of sleeping with her. She immediately replied no. He, on the receipt of the above answer, told her it was the will of the Lord that he should have intercourse with her, and that he never proceeded to do anything of that kind with any woman without first having the will of the Lord on the subject; and further he told her that if she would consent, she could make his house her home as long as she wished to do so, and that she should never want for anything it was in his power to assist her to. But she would not consent to it. He then told her that if she would let him sleep with her that night he would give her five dollars; but she refused all his propositions. He then told her that she must never tell of his propositions to her, for he had all influence in that place, and if she told he would ruin her character, and she would be under the necessity of leaving. He then went to an adjoining bed where the widow ____ was sleeping, got into bed with her, and lay there until about 1 o'clock, when he got up, bid them good night, and left them, and further this deponent saith not.
 

"MELISSA (her X mark) SCHINDLE.

"Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 2d day July, 1842.
                "A. FULKERSON, J. P.
(seal.)

Joe, did you offer another sacrifice? If not, the destroying angel will come; but as you succeeded with Mrs. _____ that night, as you told me, that may take off the curse. Joe says "there are wonderful things in the land of Ham, and terrible things by the Red Sea."

I must now bring this short letter to a close, but will write in a few days.

                Yours, respectfully.
                                "JOHN C. BENNETT."


We find in the St. Louis Bulletin of the 16th the affidavit of Martha M. Brotherton who is referred to in the preceding letter of Gen. Bennett. We annex the material parts of it.

                              "ST. LOUIS, July 13th, A, D. 1842.
"GEN. JOHN. C. BENNETT. -- DEAR SIR: I left Warsaw a short time since for this city, and having been called upon by you, through the "Sangamo Journal," to come out and disclose to the world the facts of the case in relation to certain propositions made to me at Nauvoo, by some of the Mormon leaders, I now proceed to respond to the call, and discharge what I consider go be a duty devolving upon me as an innocent, but insulted and abused female. I had been at Nauvoo near three weeks, during which time my father's family received frequent visits from Elders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, two of the Mormon apostles; when early one morning, they both came to my brother-in-law's (John Mellwrick's) house, at which place I then was on a visit, and particularly requested me to go and spend a few days with them.

Here the lady speaks of her consenting to visit Joe Smith's store in company with Kimball.

"So Kimball and I went to the store together. As we were going along, he said, "Sister Martha, are you willing to do all that the Prophet requires you to do?" I said I believed I was, thinking of course he would require nothing wrong. "Well," said he, "there are many things revealed in these last days that the world would laugh and scoff at; but unto us is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom." He further observed, "Martha, you must learn to hold your tongue, and it will be well with you. You will see Joseph, and very likely have some conversation with him, and he will tell you what you shall do." When we reached the building, he led me up some stairs to a small room, the door of which was locked, and on it the following inscription, "positively no admittance." He observed, "Ah! brother Joseph must be sick, for strange to say, he is not here. Come down into the tithing-office, Martha." He then left me in the tithing-office, and went out, I know not where. In this office were two men writing, one of whom, William Clayton, I had seen in England; the other I did not know. Young came in, and seated himself before me, and asked where Kimball was. I said he had gone out. He said it was all right. Soon after, Joseph came in and spoke to one of the clerks, and then went up stairs followed by Young. Immediately after, Kimball came in. "Now, Martha," said he, "the Prophet has come; come up stairs." I went, and we found Young and the Prophet alone. I was introduced to the Prophet by Young. Joseph offered me his seat, and, to my astonishment, the moment I was seated, Joseph and Kimball walked out of the room and left me with Young, who arose, locked the door, closed the window, and drew the curtain. He smiled, and then proceeded: "Sister Martha, I want to ask you a few questions; will you answer them?" "Yes, sir," said I. "Well," said he, "what are your feelings toward me?" -- I replied, "My feelings are just the same towards you that they ever were, sir." "But, to come to the point more closely," said he, "have not you an affection for me, that, were it lawful and right, you could accept of me for your husband and companion?" My feelings at that moment were indescribable. God only knows them. What, thought I are these men, that I thought almost perfection itself, deceivers? and is all my fancied happiness but a dream? It was even so; but my next thought was, which is the best way for me to act at this time? If I say no, they may do as they think proper; and to say yes, I never would. So I considered it best to ask for time to think and pray about it. I therefore said, "If it was lawful and right, perhaps I might; but you know, sir, it is not." "Well, but," said he, "brother Joseph has had a revelation from God that it is lawful and right for a man to have two wives; for, as it was in the days of Abraham, so it shall be in these last days; and whoever is the first that is willing to take up the cross will receive the greatest blessings; and if you will accept of me, I will take you straight to the celestial kingdom; and if you will have me in this world, I will have you in that which is to come, and brother Joseph will marry us here to-day, and you can go home this evening, and your parents will not know anything about it." "But brother Joseph wishes to have some talk with you on the subject. He will explain things; will you hear him?" "I do not mind," said I. "Well, but I want you to say something," said he. "I want time to think about it," said I. "Well," said he, "I will have a kiss, any how," and then rose, and said he would bring Joseph. He then unlocked the door, and took the key, and locked me up alone. He was absent about ten minutes, and then returned with Joseph. "Well," said Young, "sister Martha would be willing if she knew if was lawful and right before God." "Well, Martha," said Joseph, "it is lawful and right before God -- I know it is. Look here, sis; don't you believe in me?" I did not answer. "Well Martha," said Joseph, "just go ahead, and do as Brigham wants you to: he is the best man in the world, except me." "Well," said Young, "we believe Joseph to be a Prophet." "Yes," said Joseph, "and I know that this is lawful and right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it before God; and I have the keys of the kingdom, and whatever I bind on earth is bound in Heaven, and whatever I loose on earth is loosed in Heaven, and if you will accept of Brigham, you shall be blessed -- God shall bless you, and my blessing shall rest upon you; and if you will be led by him, you will do well; for I know Brigham will take care of you, and if he [missing line, see below] make him; and if you do not like it in a month or two, come to me, and I will make you free again; [out of place line, see above: don't do his duty to you, come to me and I will] and if he turns you off, I will take you on." I then rose to go, when Joseph commenced to beg of me again. He said it was the best opportunity they might have for months, for the room was often engaged. I, however, had determined what to do. I shall proceed to a justice of the peace, and make oath to the truth of these statements, and you are at liberty to make what use of them you may think best.
              "Yours, respectfully,
                   "MARTHA H. BROTHERTON.

"Sworn to and subscribed before me, this 13th day of July, A. D. 1842.

              "DU BOUFFAY FREMON.
    "Justice of the Peace for St. Louis county.

The New York Herald

July 25, 1842

July 26, 1842

https://www.loc.gov/resource/sn83030313/1842-07-26/ed-1/?sp=2&st=image&r=0.463,1.023,0.363,0.31,0

 

July 25, 1842

https://www.loc.gov/item/sn83030313/1842-07-25/ed-1/

Alton Telegraph & Democratic Review

July 30, 1842

Political.

From the St. Louis Bulletin.

MESSERS. EDITORS -- I am about to repair to the East, for the purpose of publishing a HISTORY OF THE SAINTS,. or important disclosures in relation to Joe Smith and the Mormons. I shall, however, be in readiness to substantiate my statements relative to the participation of Joe Smith in the attempted assassination of Governor Boggs, whenever he is demanded and secured by the Executive of Missouri.

I am blamed by some for not making disclosures at an earlier day, as I must have been apprised of Smith's enormities for a long time. This I anticipated. But if gentlemen will hold on a short time, until I publish the aforesaid history, I will show that had an expose been attempted at an earlier period, it would have proved abortive; but I am now enabled to show such a system of deliberate swindling, corruption, and base depravity, as the world has never seen. The following letter from Miss Brotherton, details a case of black-hearted villainy precisely similar to those of Mrs. Sarah M. Pratt, wife of Prof. Orson Pratt, and Miss Nancy Rigdon, daughter of Sidney Rigdon, Esq., as noticed in the Sangamo Journal, and hundreds of others that might be named. It speaks for itself.
                          Yours, respectfully,
                                  JOHN C. BENNETT.
St. Louis, July 15, 1842.



                          St. Louis, Mo., July 13, A. D. 1842.
Gen. John C. Bennett:
DEAR SIR -- I left Warsaw a short time since for this city, and having been called upon by you, through the Sangamo Journal, to come out and disclose to the world the facts of the case in relation to certain propositions made to me at Nauvoo, by some of the Mormon leaders, I now proceed to respond to the call, and discharge what I consider go be a duty devolving upon me as an innocent, but insulted and abused female.

I had been at Nauvoo near three weeks, during which time my father's family received frequent visits from Elders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, two of the Mormon Apostles; when, early one morning, they both came to my brother-in-law's (John Mellwrick) house, at which place I then was on a visit, and particularly requested me to go and spend a few days with them. I told them I could not at that time, as my brother-in-law was not at home. However, they urged me to go the next day, and spend one day with them; the day being fine, I accordingly went. When I arrived at the foot of the hill, Young and Kimball were standing conversing together. They both came to me, and, after several flattering compliments, Kimball wished me to go to his house first. I said it was immaterial to me, and accordingly went. We had not, however, gone many steps when Young suddenly stopped, and said he would go to that brother's, (pointing to a little log hut a few yards distant) and tell him that you (speaking to Kimball) and brother Glover, or Grover, (I do not remember which) will value this land. When he had gone, Kimball turned to me and said, 'Martha, I want you to say to my wife, when you go to my house, that you want to buy some things at Joseph's store, (Joseph Smith's) and I will say I am going with you, to show you the way. You know you want to see the Prophet, and you will then have an opportunity.' I made no reply. Young again made his appearance, and the subject was dropped. We soon reached Kimball's house, where Young took his leave, saying, 'I shall see you again, Martha.' I remained at Kimball's nearly an hour, when Kimball, seeing that I would not tell the lies he wished me to, told them to his wife himself. He then went and whispered in her ear, and asked if that would please her. 'Yes,' said she, 'or I can go along with you and Martha.' 'No,' said he, 'I have some business to do, and I will call for you afterwards to go with me to the debate,' -- meaning the debate between yourself and Joseph. To this she consented. So Kimball and I went to the store together. As we were going along, he said, 'Sister Martha, are you willing to do all that the Prophet requires you to do?' I said I believed I was, thinking of course he would require nothing wrong. 'Then,' said he, 'are you ready to take counsel?' I answered in the affirmative, thinking of the great and glorious blessings that had been pronounced upon my head, if I adhered to the counsel of those placed over me in the Lord. 'Well,' said he, 'there are many things revealed in these last days that the world would laugh and scoff at; but unto us is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom.' He further observed, 'Martha, you must learn to hold your tongue, and it will be well with you. You will see Joseph, and very likely have some conversation with him, and he will tell you what you shall do.' When we reached the building, he led me up some stairs to a small room, the door of which was locked, and on it the following inscription: -- 'Positively no admittance.' He observed, 'Ah! brother Joseph must be sick, for strange to say, he is not here. Come down into the tithing-office, Martha.' He then left me in the tithing-office, and went out, I know not where. In this office were two men writing, one of whom, William Clayton, I had seen in England; the other I did not know. Young came in, and seated himself before me, and asked where Kimball was. I said he had gone out. He said it was all right. Soon after, Joseph came in, and spoke to one of the clerks, and then went up stairs, followed by Young. Immediately after, Kimball came in. 'Now, Martha,' said he, 'the Prophet has come; come up stairs.' I went, and we found Young and the Prophet alone. I was introduced to the Prophet by Young. Joseph offered me his seat, and, to my astonishment, the moment I was seated, Joseph and Kimball walked out of the room, and left me with Young; who arose, locked the door, closed the window, and drew the curtain. He then came and sat before me, and said, 'This is our private room, Martha.' 'Indeed, sir,' said I, 'I must be highly honored to be permitted to enter it.' He smiled, and then proceeded -- 'Sister Martha, I want to ask you a few questions; will you answer them?' 'Yes, sir,' said I. 'And will you promise not to mention them to any one?' 'If it is your desire, sir,' said I, 'I will not.' 'And you will not think any the worse of me for it, will you, Martha?' said he. 'No sir,' I replied. 'Well,' said he, 'what are your feelings toward me?' I replied, 'My feelings are just the same towards you that they ever were, sir.' 'But, to come to the point more closely,' said he, 'have not you an affection for me, that, were it lawful and right, you could accept of me for your husband and companion.'

My feelings at that moment were indescribable. God only knows them. What, thought I are these men, that I thought almost perfection itself, deceivers? and is all my fancied happiness but a dream? It was even so; but my next thought was, which is the best way for me to act at this time? If I say no, they may do as they think proper; and to say yes, I never would. So I considered it best to ask for time to think and pray about it. I therefore said, 'If it was lawful and right, perhaps I might; but you know, sir, it is not.' -- 'Well, but,' said he, 'brother Joseph has had a revelation from God that it is lawful and right for a man to have two wives; for, as it was in the days of Abraham, so it shall be in these last days; and whoever is the first that is willing to take up the cross will receive the greatest blessings; and if you will accept of me, I will take you straight to the celestial kingdom; and if you will have me in this world, I will have you in that which is to come, and brother Joseph will marry us here to-day, and you can go home this evening, and your parents will not know any thing about it.' 'Sir,' said I, 'I should not like to do any thing of the kind without the permission of my parents,' 'Well, but,' said he, 'you are of age, are you not?' 'No, sir,' said I, 'I shall not be until the 24th of May.' 'Well,' said he, 'that does not make any difference. You will be of age before they know, and you need not fear. If you will take my counsel, it will be well with you, for I know it to be right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it. But brother Joseph wishes to have some talk with you on the subject -- he will explain things -- will you hear him?' 'I do not mind,' said I. 'Well, but I want you to say something,' said he. 'I want time to think about it,' said I. 'Well,' said he, 'I will have a kiss, any how,' and then rose, and said he would bring Joseph. He then unlocked the door, and took the key, and locked me up alone. He was absent about ten minutes, and then returned with Joseph. 'Well,' said Young, 'sister Martha would be willing if she knew if was lawful and right before God.' 'Well, Martha,' said Joseph, 'it is lawful and right before God -- I know it is. Look here, sis; don't you believe in me?' I did not answer. 'Well Martha,' said Joseph, 'just go ahead, and do as Brigham wants you to -- he is the best man in the world, except me.' 'Oh!' said Brigham, 'then you are as good.' 'Yes,' said Joseph. 'Well,' said Young, 'we believe Joseph to be a Prophet. -- I have known him near eight years, and always found him the same.' 'Yes,' said Joseph, 'and I know that this is lawful and right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it before God; and I have the keys of the kingdom, and whatever I bind on earth is bound in heaven, and whatever I loose on earth is loosed in heaven, and if you will accept of Brigham, you shall be blessed -- God shall bless you, and my blessing shall rest upon you; and if you will be led by him, you will do well; for I know Brigham will take care of you, and if he don't do his duty to you, come to me and I will make him; and if you do not like it in a month or two, come to me, and I will make you free again; and if he turns you off, I will take you on.' -- 'Sir,' said I, rather warmly, 'it will be too late to think in a month or two after. I want time to think first.' 'Well, but,' said he, 'the old proverb is, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained;" and it would be the greatest blessing that was ever bestowed upon you.' 'Yes,' said Young, 'and you will never have reason to repent it -- that is, if I do not turn from righteousness, and that I trust I never shall; for I believe God, who has kept me so long, will continue to keep me faithful. Did you ever see me act in any way wrong in England, Martha?' "No, sir,' said I. 'No,' said he; 'neither can any one else lay any thing to my charge.' 'Well, then,' said Joseph, 'what are you afraid of, sis? -- come, let me do the business for you.' 'Sir,' said I, 'do let me have a little time to think about it, and I will promise not to mention it to any one.' 'Well, but look here,' said he; 'you know a fellow will never be damned for doing the best he knows how.' 'When, then,' said I, 'the best way I know of, is to go home and think and pray about it.' 'Well,' said Young, 'I shall leave it with brother Joseph, whether it would be best for you to have time or not.' 'Well,' said Joseph, 'I see no harm in her having time to think, if she will not fall into temptation.' 'O, sir,' said I, 'there is no fear of my falling into temptation.' 'Well, but,' said Brigham, 'you must promise me you will never mention it to any one.' 'I do promise it,' said I. 'Well,' said Joseph, 'you must promise me the same.' I promised him the same. 'Upon your honor,' said he, 'you will not tell.' 'No, sir, I will lose my life first,' said I. 'Well, that will do,' said he; 'that is the principle we go upon. I think I can trust you, Martha,' said he. -- 'Yes,' said I, 'I think you ought.' Joseph said, 'she looks as if she could keep a secret.' I then rose to go, when Joseph commenced to beg of me again -- he said it was the best opportunity they might have for months, for the room was often engaged. I, however, had determined what to do. 'Well,' said Young, 'I will see you to-morrow. I am going to preach at the school-house, opposite your house. I have never preached there yet; you will be there, I suppose.' 'Yes,' said I. The next day being Sunday, I sat down, instead of going to meeting, and wrote the conversation, and gave it to my sister, who was not a little surprised; but she said it would be best to go to meeting in the afternoon. We went, and Young administered the sacrament. After it was over, I was passing out, and Young stopped me, saying, 'Wait, Martha, I am coming.' I said, 'I cannot; my sister is waiting for me.' He then threw his coat over his shoulders, and followed me out, and whispered, 'Have you made up your mind, Martha?' 'Not exactly, sir,' said I; and we parted. I shall proceed to a justice of the peace, and make oath to the truth of these statements, and you are at liberty to make what use of them you may think best.
              Yours, respectfully,
                   "MARTHA H. BROTHERTON.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, this 13th day of July, A. D. 1842.

              "Dr. BOUFFAY FREMON,
    "Justice of the Peace for St. Louis county.
 

Quincy Whig

August, 6, 1842

Mormon Revelation.

MISS  MARTHA  BROTHERTON'S  STATEMENT.
                St. Louis Mo. July 13th, 1842.

Gen. John C. Bennett.


Dear sir: -- I left Warsaw a short time since for this city, and having been called upon by you through the Sangamo Journal, to come out and disclose to the world the facts of the case in relation to certain propositions made to me at Nauvoo, by some of the Mormon leaders, I now proceed to respond to the call, and discharge what I consider a duty devolving upon me as an innocent but insulted and abused female. I had been at Nauvoo near three weeks, during which time my father's family received frequent visits form Elders Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, two of the Mormon apostles, when early one morning, they both came to my brother-in-law's (John McIlwricks) house, at which place I was then on a visit, and they particularly requested me to go and spend a few days with them. I told them I could not at that time, as my brother-in-law was not at home; however they urged me to go the next day and spend one day with them -- the day being fine I accordingly went. When I arrived at the foot of the hill, Young and Kimball were standing conversing together. They both came to me, and after flattering compliments, Kimball wished me to go to his house first. I said it was immaterial to me, and accordingly went. We had noy however, gone many steps when Young suddenly stopped and said he would go to that brother's (pointing to a little log hut a few yards distant,) and tell him that you (speaking to Kimball.) and brother Glover or Grover, I do not remember which, will value his land. -- When he had gone, Kimball turned to me and said, "Martha, I want you to say to my wife, when you go to my house, that you want to buy some things at Joseph's store, (Joseph Smith's) and I will say I am going with you to show you the way; you want to see the prophet, and you will then have an opportunity." I made no reply. Young again made his appearance, and the subject was dropped. We soon reached Kimball's house, where Young took his leave saying, "I shall see you again Martha." I remained at Kimball's near an hour, when Kimball seeing that I would not tell the lies he wished me to, told them to his wife himself. He then went and whispered in her ear, and asked if that would please her. "Yes" said she, "or I can go along with you and Martha." "No," said he, "I have some business to do and I will call for you afterwards to go with me to the debate," meaning the debate between yourself and Joseph. To this she consented. So Kimball and I went to the store together.

As we were going along, he said, "Sister Martha, are you willing to do all that the Prophet requires you to do?" I said I was, thinking of course he would require nothing wrong. "Then, are you ready to take counsel?" I answered in the affirmative, thinking of the great and glorious blessings that had been pronounced upon my head, if I adhered to the counsel of those placed over me in the Lord. "Well, " said he, "there are many things revealed in these last days that the world would laugh and scoff at, but unto us is given to know the mysteries of the kingdom. " He further observed, "Martha, you must learn to hold your tongue, and it will be well with you. You will see Joseph, and very likely have some conversation with him, and he will tell you what you shall do." When we reached the building he led me up stairs to a small room, the door of which was locked, and on it the following inscription -- "Positively no admittance." He observed, "Ah! brother Joseph must be sick, for strange to say he is not here. Come down into the tithing office, Martha," and went out, I know not where. In this office were two men writing, one of whom, William Clayton, I had seen in England; the other I did not know. Young came in and seated himself before me, and asked where Kimball was. I said he had gone out. -- He said it was all right. Soon after Joseph came in and spoke to one of the clerks, and then went up stairs followed by Young. Immediately after Kimball came in. --

"Now Martha, " said he, "the Prophet has come, come up stairs." I went and found Young and the Prophet alone. I was introduced to the Prophet by Young. Joseph offered me his seat, and to my astonishment, the moment I was seated Joseph and Kimball walked out of the room, and left me with Young, who arose, locked the door, closed the window and drew the curtain. He then came and sat before me and said, "This is our private room, Martha." Indeed sir, said I, I must be highly honored to be permitted to enter it. He smiled, and then proceeded, "Sister Martha, I want to ask you a few questions; will you answer them?" "Yes, sir," said I. "And will you promise not to mention them to any one?" "If it is your desire sir," said I, "I will not." "And you will not think any the worse of me for it, will you Martha?" said he. "No sir," I replied. -- "Well," said he, "what are your feelings towards me?" I replied "My feelings are just the same towards you that they ever were sir." "But come to the point more closely," said he, "have not you an affection for me, that, were it lawful and right you could accept of me for your husband and companion?"

My feelings at that moment were indescribable. God only knows them. What, thought I, are these men that I thought almost perfection itself, deceivers and is all my fancied happiness but a dream? 'Twas even so; but my next thought was, which was the best way for me to act at this time; If I say no, they may do as they think proper; and to say yes, I never would. So I considered it best to ask for time to think and pray about it. I therefore said "If it was lawful and right perhaps I might; but you know sir, it is not." "Well, but," said he "brother Joseph has a revelation from God that it is lawful and right for a man to have two wives; for as it was in the days of Abraham, so it shall be in these last days, and whoever is the first that is willing to take up the cross will receive the greatest blessings; and if you will accept of me I will take you straight to the celestial kingdom; and if you will have me in this world, I will have you in that which is to come, and brother Joseph will marry us to-day, and you can go home this very evening and your parents will not know any thing about it." "Sir," said I, "I should not like to do any thing of the kind without the permission of my parents." "Well, but," said he, "you are of age, are you not?" "No sir," said I, "I shall not be until the 24th of May." "Well," said he, "that does not make any difference. You will be of age before they know, and you need not fear. If you will take my advice it will be well with you, for I know it to be right before God and there is no sin in it, I will answer for it. -- But however Joseph wishes to have some talk with you on the subject -- he will explain things -- will you hear him?" "I do not mind," said I. "Well but I want you to say something," said he. "I want time to think about it, said I. "Well," said he, "I will have a kiss any how," and then rose and said he would bring Joseph.

He then unlocked the door, and took the key and locked me up alone. He was absent about ten minutes and then returned with Joseph, "Well" said Young, "sister Martha would be willing if she knew it was lawful and right before God." "Well Martha," said Joseph, "it is lawful and right before God -- I know it is. Look here, sister, don't you believe in me?" I did not answer. -- "Well Martha, said Joseph, "just go ahead and do as Brigham wants you to -- he is the best man in the world except me." "Oh!" said Brigham, "then you are as good," -- "Yes," said Joseph. "Well," said Young, "we believe Joseph to be a prophet -- have known him near eight years, and always found him the same." "Yes," said Joseph, "and I know it is lawful and right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it before God; and I have the keys of the Kingdom, and whatever I bind on earth is bound in heaven, and whatever I loose on earth is loosed in heaven -- and if you accept of Brigham, you shall be blessed -- God shall bless you, and my blessing shall rest upon you; if you will be led by him you will do well, for I know Brigham will take care of you, and if he don't do his duty to you, come to me and I will make him. And if you do not like it in a month or two come to me and I will make you free again; and if he turns you off I will take you on." "Sir," said I, rather warmly, "it will be too late to think in a month or two after. I want to think first." "Well, but," said he, "the old proverb is, 'nothing ventured, nothing gained,' and it would be the greatest blessing that ever was bestowed upon you." "Yes," said Young, "and you will never have reason to repent of it -- that is, if I do not turn from righteousness, and that I trust I never shall, for I believe God who has kept me so long will continue to keep me faithful. Did you ever see me act in any way wrong in England Martha?" "No sir," said I. "No," said he, "neither can any one else lay any thing to my charge."

"Well, then" said Joseph, "what are you afraid of, Sis -- come let me do the business for you." "Sir," said I, "do let me have a little time to think about it, and I will promise not to mention it to any one." "Well, but look here," said he, "you know a fellow will never be damned for doing the best he knows how." "Well then," said I, "the best way I know of is to go home and think and pray about it." -- "Well" said Young, "I shall leave it with Brother Joseph, whether it would be best for you to have time or not." "Well," said Joseph, "I see no harm in her having time to think, she will not fall into temptation." "O sir," said I, "there is no fear of my falling into temptation." "Well, but," said Brigham, "you must promise me you will never mention it to any one." "I do promise it," said I. "Well," said Joseph, "you must promise me the same." I promised him the same. "Upon your honor," said he, "You will not tell." "No sir, I will lose my life first," said I. -- "Well, that will do," said he, "that is the principle we go upon. I think I can trust you Martha," said he. "Yes," said I, "I think you ought." Joseph said, "she looks as if she could keep a secret."

I then rose to go, when Joseph commenced to beg of me again -- he said it was the best opportunity they might have for months, for the room was often engaged. I however had determined what to do. -- "Well," said Young, "I will see you tomorrow, I am going to preach at the school house opposite your house, I have never preached there yet; you will be there I suppose." "Yes," said I. The next day being Sunday, I sat down, instead of going to meeting, and wrote the conversation and gave it to my sister, who was not a little surprised, but she said it would be best to go to the meeting in the afternoon. -- We went, and Young administered the sacrament. After it was over, I was passing out and Young stopped me, saying, "Wait Martha -- I am coming." I said "I cannot -- my sister is waiting for me." -- He then threw his coat over his shoulders and followed me out and whispered "have you made up your mind, Martha?" "Not exactly, sir," said I, and we parted.

I shall proceed to the justice of the peace and make oath to the truth of these statements, and you are at liberty to make what use of them you think best.
        Yours, Respectfully
               MARTHA H. BROTHERTON.

Sworn and subscribed before me, this 13th day of July, A. D. 1842.
         Du Bouffray Fremon.

Justice of the Peace for St. Louis County

[Quincy Whig, August 6, 1842]

[Quincy Whig Photocopy]

History of the Saints 
by John C. Bennett

c. September 1842

MISS MARTHA H. BROTHERTON.

Miss Brotherton is a very good-looking, amiable, and accomplished English lady, of highly respectable parentage, cultivated intellect, and spotless moral character. She was selected as one of the victims for the Cloister^ in order to be consecrated to apostolic brutality. The Right Reverend Brigham Young, the President of the Mormon College of Apostles, {Collegium de Propaganda Fide,) it is well known regarded her with an evil eye, and she was also eagerly sought afler by the Holy Prophet Joe, and by Apostle Heber C. Kimball. Gods 1 what a triumvirate ! and united, too, for such a sanctified purpose ! These celestial gladiators, armed with the " sword of the Spirit," leaguing themselves in a Holy Alliance for the destruction of a defenceless and innocent woman, and urging on their work of sin and pollution with the most fiendish zeal and malignity ! '* Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon." These three Mormon demigods, these Prophets and Apostles, were completely foiled in their hopeful scheme, and utterly defeated by the determined resistance of their intended victim, as will be seen by the following graphic letter from her own pen : —

" St. Louis, Misaouri, Jviy 13, A. D. 1843.

" General John C. Bennett :

"Dear Sir,—

"I lefl Warsaw a short time since for this city, and having been called upon by you, through the * Sangamo Journal,' to codi6 out and disclose to the world the facts of the case in relation to certain propositions made to me at Nauvoo, by some of the Mormon leaders, I now proceed to respond to the call, and discharge what I consider to be a duty devolving upon me as an innocent, but insulted and abuied femalo. I had been at Nauvoo near three weeks, during which time my father's family received frequent visits from Elders Bri^ham Youn? and Heber C. Kimball, two of the Mormon Apostles ; when, early one morning, they botn came to my brother-m-law's (Jolin McUwrtck's) house, at which place I then was on a visit, and paxticulariy requested me to go and spend a few days with them. I told them I could not at that time, as my brother-in-law was not at home ; however, they urged me to go the next day, and spend one day with them. The day being fine, I accordingly went. Wnen I arrived at the foot of the hill. Young and Kimball were standing conversing together. They both caiue to me, and, ailer sever«u flattering compliments, Kimball wished me to go to his house first. I said it was immaterial to me, and accordingly went. We had not, however, gone many steps when Young suodenly stopped, and said he would go to that brother's, (pointing to a little log hut a few * yards distant,) and tell him that yeu (speaking to Kimball) and brother Glover, or Grover, (I do not remember which,) will value his land. When he had gone, Kimball turned to me and said, * Martha, I want yqu to say to my wife, when you so to my house, that you want to buy some things at Joseph's store, (Joseph smith's,) and I will say I am goinff with you, to show you the way. You know you want to see me Prophet, and you will then have an opportunity.' I made no reply. Young again made his appearance, and the subject was dropped. We soon reached Kimball's house, where Young took his leave, saying, *■ I shall see you again, Martha.' I remained at Kimball's near an hour, when Kimball, seeing that 1 would not tell the lies he wished me to, told them to his wife him■elf. He then went and whispered in her ear, and asked if that would please her. *• Yes,' said she, *• or I can go along with you and Martha.' * No,' said he, *• I have some business to do, and I will call for you afterwards to go with me to the debate,' meaning the debate between yourself and Joseph. To this she consented. So Kimball and I went to the store together. As we were going along, he said, * Sister Martha, are you willing to do all that the rrophet requires you to do ? ' I said 1 believed I was, thinking of course h$ would require nothing wrong. * Then,' said he, * are you ready to take counsel ? ' I answered in the affirmative, thinking of the great and glorious blessings that had been pronounced upon my head, if I adhered to the coun^l of those placed over me in tne Lord. ^ Well,' said he, '• there are many things revealed in these last days that the world would laugh and scon at ; but unto us is given to know the mysteries of the' kingdom.' He further observed, * Martha, you must learn to hold your tongue, and it will be well with you. You will see Joseph, and very likely have some conversation with him, and he will tell you what you shall do.* When we reached the building, he led me up some stairs to a small room, the door of which was locked, and on it the following inscription : * Positively no admittance.' He observed, ' Ah ! brother Joseph must be sick, for, strange to say, he is not here. Come down into the ti thing-office, Martha.' He then left me in the tithing-office, and went out, I know not where. In this office were two men writing, one of whom, William Clayton, I had seen in £nffland ; the oUier I did not know. Young came in, ajid seated himself before me, and asked where Kimball was. I said he had gone put. He said it was all right. Soon after, Joseph came in, and spoke to one of the clerks, and then went up stairs, followed by Young. Immediately after, Kimball came in. * Now, Martha,' said he, * the Prophet has come ; come up stairs.' I went, and we found Young and the Prophet alone. 1 was introduced to the Prophet by Young. Joseph offered me his seat, and, to my astonishment, the moment I was seated, Joseph and Kimball walked out of the room, and left me with Young, who arose, locked the door, closed the window, and drew the curtain. He then came and sat before me, and said, * This is our private room, Martha.' * Indeed, sir,' said I, ' I must be highly honored to be permitted to enter it.' He smiled, and then proceeded — * Sister Martha, I want to ask you a few questions j will you answer them ? *

* Yes, sir,' said I. ' And will you promise not to mention them to any one .'" * If it is your desire, sir,' said I, * I will not.' * And you will not think any the worse of me for it, will you, Martha ? ' said he. * No, sir,' I replied. ' Well,' said he, * what are your feelinffs towards me .^ ' I replied, * My feelings are just the same towards you that they ever were, sir.' * But, to come to the point more closely,' said he, * have not you an affection for me, that, were it lawful and right, vou could accept of me for your husband and companion .'* * My feelings at that moment were indescribable. God only knows them. What, thought I, are these men, that I thought almost perfection itself, deceivers ? and is all my fancied happiness but a dream ? 'Twas even so ; but my next thought was, which is the best way for me to act at this time .'' If I say wo, they may do as they think proper ; and to say yes, I never would. So I considered it best to ask for time to think and pray about it. I therefore said,

* If it was lawful and right, perhaps i might ; but you know, sir, it is not,' * Well, but,' said he, ' brother Joseph has had a revelation from ^Grod that it is lawful and riffht for a man to have two wives ; for, as it was in the days of Abraham, so it shall be in these last days, and whoever is the first that is willing to take up the cross will receive the greatest blessings ; and if you will accept of me, I will take you straight to the celestial kingdom ; and if you will have me in this world, I will have you in that which is to come', and brother Joseph will marry us here to-day, and you can go home this evening, and your parents will not know any thing about it.* *• Sir,' said I, * I should hot like to do any thing of tiie kind witliout the permission of my parents.' * Well, but,' said he, *you are of age, are you not .?' * No, sir,' said I, * I shall not be until the 24th of May.' * Well,' said he, * that does not make any difference. You will be of age before they know, and you need not fear. If you will take my counsel, it will be well with you, for 1 know it to be right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it. But brother Joseph wishes to havesQme talk with you on the subject — he will explain things — will you hear him ?* * I do not mind,' said 1.

* Well, but I want you to say something,' said he. ' I want time to think about it,' said I. * Well,' said he, * I will have a kiss, any how,* and then rose, and said he would brin? Joseph. He then unlocked the door, and took the key, and locked me up alone. He was absent about ten minutes, and then returned with Joseph. *■ Well ,' said Young, * sister Martha would be willing if she knew it was lawful and right before God.' * WeU, JV^artha/ said Joseph, * it is lawful and right before Grod — I know it is. Look here, sis j don't you believe in me.'*' I did not answer. * Well, Martha,' said Joseph, *just go ahead, and do as Brighaoi wants you to — he is the best man in the world, except me.' * O ! ' said Brigham, * then you are as good.'

* Yes,' said Joseph. * Well,' said Young, * we believe Joscpli to be a Prophet. I have known him near eight years, and always found him the same. * Yes,' said Joseph, * and I know that this is lawful and right before God, and if there is any sin in it, I will answer for it before God; and I have the keys of the kingdom, and whatever !< bind on earth is bound in heaven, and whatever I loose on earth is loosed in heaven , and if you will accept of Bri^ham, you shall be blessed — God shall bless you, and my blessing shall rest upon you ; and if you will be led by him, you will do well; for I know Brigham will take care of you, and if he don't do his duty to you, come to me, and 1 will jiiake him ; and if you do not like it in a month or two, come to me, and I will make you free again ; and if he turns you otf, I will take you on.' * Sir,' said I, rather warmly, ' it will be too late to think in a month or two after. 1 want time to think first.'

* Well, but,' said he, *the old proverb is, " Nothing ventured, nothing gained; " and it would be the greatest blessing that was ever bestowed upon you.' ' Yes,' said Young, ' and you will never have reason to repent it — that is, if I do not turn from righteousness, and that I trust I never shall ; for I believe God, who has kept me so long, will continue to keep me faithful. Did you ever see me act in any way wrong in England, Martha ? ' * No, sir,' said I. * No,' said he ; ' neither can any one else lay any thing to my charge.' * Well, then,' said Joseph, ' what are you afraid of, sis ^ Come, let me do the business for you.' * Sir,' said I, ^ do let me have a little time to think about it, and I will promise not to mention it to any one.'

* Well, but look here,' said he ; * you know a fellow v/ill never be damned for doing the best he knows how.' ' Well, then,' said I, ' the best way I know of, is to go home and think and pray about it.' ' Well,' said Young, ' I shall leave it with brother Joseph, whether it would be best for you to have time or not.' ' Well,' said Joseph, ^ I see no harm in her having time to think, if she will not fall into temptation.' ' O, sir,' said I, * there is no fear of my falling into temptation.' * Well, but,' said Brigham, * you must promise me you will never mention it to any one.' * I do promise it,' said I. * Well,' said Joseph, 'you must promise me the same.' I promised him the same. ' Upon your honor,' said he, ' you will not tell * No, sir, I will lose my life first,' sajd I. * Well, that will do,' saia he ; ' that is the principle we so upon. I think I can trust you, Martha,' said he. * Yes,' said I, ' 1 think you ought.' Joseph said, * She looks as if she could keep a secret.' I then rose to go, when Joseph commenced to beg of me again. He said it was tlie best opportunity they might have for months, for the room was often engaged. 1, however, had determined what to ^o. ' Well,' said Young, * 1 will see you to-morrow. I am going to preach at the school-house, opposite your house. I have never preached there yet; you will be there, I suppose.' ^ Yes,* said I. — The next day being Sunday, ■at down, instead of going to meeting, and wrote the conversation, and gave it to my sister, who was not a little surprised ; bat she said it would i>e best to go to meeting in the afternoon. We went, and Young administered the sacrament. After it was over, I was passing out, and Toung stopped me, saying, ^ Wait, Martha, I am coming.' I said, * I cannot; my sister is waiting for me.' He then threw his coat over his shoulders, and followed me out, and whispered, * Have you made up your mind, Martha ? ' ^ Not exactly, sir,* said I ; and we parted. I shall proceed to a justice of the peace, and make oath to the truth of these statements, and you are at liberty to make •what use of them you may think best.

" Yours, respectfully,

" Martha H. Brotherton.

" Sworn to and subscribed before me, this 13th day of July, A. D. 1842. " Do BouFFAY Fremon,

^^ Justice of the Peace for St. Louis County.''

What a tale of infamy I What a record of black-hearted villany and depravity! Well does this young lady deserve the praise of her sex and the world, for her courage and virtue in resisting and repulsing with such signal success the foul miscreants who were tempting her to crime by the most insidious and powerful arts.

The North^Westem Gazette and Galena Advertiser of

July 23, 1842, a paper edited by H. H. Haughton, Esq.,

in speaking on this subject, says, —

** In our columns to-day will be found the affidavit of Martha H. Brotherton, who, it will be remembered, was called upon to make a public statement of her treatment while among the Mormons. Her story is told in an artless manner, and ffoes strongly to corroborate Bennett's statement. There is sometning peculiarly infamous in the practice of sending to England to induce simplehearted females to leave their homes, to be exposed to the arts or as shrewd a set of scamps as could well be congregated together."

The Pittsburgh Morning Chronicle of July 26, 1842, a paper edited by J. Heron Foster, Esq., and Wm. H. Whitney, Esq., in alluding to the same circumstance, remarks, —

" The last Nauvoo Wasp, a Mormon pnper, contains Joe Smith's phrenological chart, in which the organ of * Amativeness * is set down as * very large — givinff a controlling influence, and very liable to perversion.' We thiuK the afhdavit of Miss Brotherton, in another column, proves the truth of the science of phrenology conclusively."

I should think as much. Joe's "Amativeness" is large,

VERY LARGE, — and perfectly unrestrained. There are

eyes that see that he knows not of, and ears that hear that

he understands aot, and that Uncircumcided Philistine will find that Samson will be upon him in a day when he looks not for him, and in an hour when he thinks not.

[John C. Bennett, The History of the Saints, 1842, pg. 236-241]

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